Category Archives: Life in the DNA lab

Do you have a lab philosophy?

Recently our lab group spent a bit of time deciding on exactly how we want to interact with one another. What is this  whole lab group business all about? What are the rules? What are the guidelines? Do we have … Continue reading

Posted in Group leadership, Life in the DNA lab, Mentoring, Undergraduates, Your lab group | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Do you have your own lab training activities?

We always worry about how well we communicate safe and accurate procedures to new students. We had  several new undergrads join our lab last spring, so we decided to have a concentrated session of training on a Saturday. Debbie Brock … Continue reading

Posted in Life in the DNA lab, Mentoring, So you think yours is the best protocol, Teaching, Undergraduates, Your lab group | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Undergrads in the lab!

Undergraduates bring joy to research. They are new, they are fresh, and they are easily amazed. They work well in teams. They are also much more likely to break the centrifuge, contaminate the bench, mislabel the samples, or even start … Continue reading

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What do polymers and social amoebae have in common? Controls!

But all the time we spent agonizing over the right controls taught Alona in a visceral way that controls were important, that an experiment without the right controls would need to be repeated, and that the right controls were not always obvious. … In an experiment like this one, we can do the whole thing over with the exact same clones, just to be sure there wasn’t some bias on a given day. Continue reading

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